In the Kitchen with Dad

Hello, I’m sorry I haven’t posted in… well, forever!  I will be writing one post a week now as part of my homeschool. I think you already know, I spend a lot of time in the kitchen. Most of the time I’m working with mom, but this post is going to be about me in the kitchen with dad.  

Disclosure

A few days ago me and my dad, were making one of our favorite dinners, Nachos.  

In-the-Kitchen-with-Dad

We got the Nachos recipe from All Recipes.  We have changed it a little bit, so I’ll list the changes:

  • 2 pounds of ground beef instead of one
  • 1 can of diced Rotel with green chilies instead of the tomatoes and jalapeno pepper
  • 32 oz Velveeta cheese and 
  • a medium onion instead of a small one.

You will also need a 3 quart pot as well as a large cooking pan.  

To start off, you will need to get the Velveeta and cut it into small cubes and add them to the pot.  Turn it to medium low (6 on our stove). Then you let the Velveeta melt, and add half of the salsa.  When the first starts melting good, then add the rest of the Velveeta as well as the other half of the salsa, and the diced tomatoes with green chilies.  Stir it.  

Kids in the kitchen

Now you move onto the stage where you add the ground beef.  To start off, add some butter and let it melt in the large cooking pan.  Then dice the medium onion into small cubes as well.  

In the Kitchen with Dad

Fry in the pan on 8 until it becomes clear.  Then, add the ground beef and let it brown.  This process usually takes up to fifteen minutes.  

After the ground beef is brown, then, add the nacho mix listed above. After that, serve in bowls.  We usually eat our nachos with white corn chips.  

It was fun cooking in the kitchen with dad for a change and the nachos were great!

 

 

We love linking up with blog hops.  Be sure to visit them and see the other posts:


Manic Mother

My Precious Cooker

 

DisclosureI’m not sure when it happened exactly, but yesterday I suddenly realized my nine-year old son is no longer just a “kid inchef hat the kitchen”, you know… being my assistant. Blake has been interested in cooking with me for years! He has always wanted to be in the kitchen helping me make anything and everything that is on the stove or in the oven! When asked what he wants to be when he grows up, for years now he has stated a “cooker”.  

This week Blake and I were cooking a Broccoli and Chicken Stir-Fry recipe (which turned out fabulous I might add)… anyway, we were in the kitchen getting everything ready. We regularly double or triple recipes because we love leftovers in our house and we have three growing boys to feed, so besides learning a life skill, Blake gets a great fraction and measurement review every time he cooks with me.  But as I was watching him gathering the ingredients, I realized he not only knew exactly where to get the ingredients from, but  he knew the tools he needed to use and how to use them and he knew how to follow the recipe.  

I watched as he gathered the cloves of garlic from the garlic/onion bin, and as he moved to pull out a cutting board and knife and proceeded to cut the ends off and slice the garlic to fit inside the mincer.  And as he leans over and re-reads the recipe to be sure that the garlic goes in at this point, my eyes follow him to the stove where he minces the garlic into the skillet and uses a knife to scrape the mincer clean! He read the recipe, knew exactly what to do, where to find everything, how to use it and without any assistance whatsoever from me! None. 

Being Montessori homeschoolers, we have always put an emphasis on practical life skills from an early age so seeing him in the kitchen is not particularly surprising… realizing he could do it without me, WAS!! I was so proud of him expertly navigating the kitchen, putting his ingredients in at the right time, and in the right amounts. Yet, to be honest it was a tiny bit bittersweet! We have now morphed into being cooking partners where we both have our own roles when working together in the kitchen! 

So, it’s official… Blake is now a cooker, my “precious” cooker!!  I am so very thankful for the opportunity to homeschool, for these times that I am fully here, in the moment, engaged and am really able to savor these experiences with my children! What an amazing blessing!! God is so good to us! Thank you Abba for these precious blessing you have given us!  

My Precious Cooker

Homeschool Curriculum, Schedule and Checklist 2013 – 2014

Homeschool Schedules, Curriculum and Daily Checklists 8th, 8th and 4th Grades

Disclosure

We are very hands-on (Montessori-ish) homeschoolers and have been homeschooling for four years, headed into our fifth! This article is all about our homeschool curriculum, schedule and checklist for 2013 -2014. Chase and Gage both are taking high school level classes so we are now using transcripts. Thankfully our umbrella school, HomeLife Academy makes it easy with their new AppleCore Reporting System!

So many people think Montessori homeschooling is akin to chaos or unschooling without structure… But that is just not accurate, as you will see with the boys’ curriculum and schedule! It is FAR from unschooling and nothing remotely close to chaos! I have included with each of my sons’ curriculum section, their schedules and their daily checklists (which includes their home chores). Montessori focuses on independence in education and the realization that we are life long learners. The tools we are using (schedules and daily checklists) are very effective at keeping them on track, holding them accountable and giving them freedom within their daily schedule. You will notice lots of study halls on their schedules. With the exception of those virtual or co-op classes that have specific times that the boys must attend at a specific time, we allow them to do their work at any time each day, as long as it is done that day. Thus the study halls sprinkled throughout the day allow for that flexibility.  

Another aspect of a Montesori education is a particular focus on life skills. You will see on the boys’ daily checklist a variety of daily chores they do from vacuuming to washing clothes. And we regularly swap out chore lists to allow for the boys to learn all aspects of running a home. We have also taken practical life skills to the next level with a focus on entrepreneurship. We realize our children will be part of the next generations’ leaders. We believe they will be the generation that gets America back on the right track, from a spiritual, economic, moral, government and academic perspective. So we are teaching them the skills they will need to achieve that goal! Each of our sons has their own business.  Their businesses focus on agriculture simply because we live on a farm (and it is a great, wholesome and healthy place to raise boys). So, it is natural for all of their businesses to be farm-based… thus we call it “farmschooling”. However, if we urban, they might not have these same businesses, but they would have some sort of business to teach them about capitalism!  

We have gotten a bit creative in how we encourage the boys to grow their writing skills… we allow them to blog about their businesses and our homeschool on our homeschool blog. All comments on our blog are moderated by me and all of their emails forward to me, so it is very controlled and protected (as much as they can be in this fallen world). The boys are really loving this new avenue of communication with the outside world called social media! It will be a part of their world when they are grown, so we might as well teach them how to use it responsibly now!  

All of our boys have a focus and desire to go to college, so you will notice they are pretty aggressive in their workload. This is primarily based on what they are capable of. Do not use our classes or our schedule as a model of a typical child in these grades. Children all learn at different levels and at different paces. Don’t ever prevent your children from running ahead if they want to. My yougest son wanted to do algebra in 3rd grade because he was chasing his older brothers.  So we let him. He has since just completed the Teaching Textbooks Pre-Algebra curriculum (in third grade) and has started the Teaching Textbooks Algebra before entering 4th grade. Let them run and only slow them down if they are setting themselves up for a huge failure that you know they would not recover from. Don’t forget what our founding fathers were by the time they were sixteen years old. Be sure your children research them and know their character!  We have got to realize, as a society, we have failed miserably in preparing the next generation. It’s up to us to turn this around!  

I can assure you, we don’t have homeschooling or child-rearing figured out, but we are in a pretty good place right now.  We are so very blessed and realize where this peace and prosperity originates!

If you have any questions, leave a comment below or email me!  I’ll do my best to answer any questions you have!  

Chase 8th Grade Curriculum

8th Grade

Algebra 2 (VideoText)

Exercises in English H (Loyola Press)

Vocabulary in Action H (Loyola Press)

All About Spelling

Classics Club via Virtual Homeschool Group

Teaching Writing Structure and Style (Institute for Excellence in Writing) 

Biology (Apologia) via Virtual Homeschool Group

Spanish II Descubre via Spanish Clicks

Finish Paths of Exploration / Start TRISMS History Makers / Masterminds

Logic (Fallacy Detective and Books from Critical Thinking Company)

Biblical Worldview  (Philosophy Adventure and Young Historians Introduction to Worldview and our Bible)

Art II via Local Co-op

Photography II via Virtual Homeschool Group

Economics (Capitalism for Kids, Commonsense Business for Kids and Starting a Micro Business Carol Topp IEW)

Photoshop via Virtual Homeschool Group

Creative Writing: Blogs at www.LiveAndLearnFarm.com and Teen Book Reviews (Psalm onenineTEEN Reviews)

8th Grade Schedule

Daily Checklist 4th, 7th and 8th Grades

Gage 7th Grade Curriculum

7th Grade

Algebra 2 (VideoText)

Exercises in English G (Loyola Press)

Vocabulary in Action G (Loyola Press)

All About Spelling

Classics Club via Virtual Homeschool Group

Teaching Writing Structure and Style (Institute for Excellence in Writing) 

Physial Science (Apologia) via Virtual Homeschool Group

Spanish II Descubre via Spanish Clicks

Finish Paths of Exploration / Start TRISMS History Makers / Masterminds

Logic (Fallacy Detective and Books from Critical Thinking Company)

Biblical Worldview  (Philosophy Adventure and Young Historians Introduction to Worldview and our Bible)

Art II via Local Co-op

Photography II via Virtual Homeschool Group

Economics (Capitalism for Kids, Commonsense Business for Kids and Starting a Micro Business Carol Topp IEW)

Illustrator via Virtual Homeschool Group

Creative Writing Blogs at www.LiveAndLearnFarm.com and chronicals his business and homeschool at Deluxe Clucks

7th Grade Schedule

Daily Checklist 4th, 7th and 8th Grade

 

Blake 4th Grade Curriculum

4th Grade 

Algebra 1 (Teaching Textbooks)

Exercises in English D/E (Loyola Press)

Vocabulary in Action D/E (Loyola Press)

Handwriting without Tears Cursive

All About Spelling

Study of Classics 

Teaching Writing Structure and Style (Institute for Excellence in Writing) 

Exploring Creation Physics and Chemistry (Apologia) 

Spanish (K-6) via Spanish Clicks

Finish Paths of Exploration / Start TRISMS History Makers / Masterminds

Logic (Fallacy Detective and Books from Critical Thinking Company)

Biblical Worldview  (Philosophy Adventure and Young Historians Introduction to Worldview and our Bible)

Economics (Capitalism for Kids, Commonsense Business for Kids and Starting a Micro Business Carol Topp IEW) NOT REQUIRED

Art II via Local Co-op

Photography II via Virtual Homeschool Group

Creative Writing Blogs at www.LiveAndLearnFarm.com 

4th Grade Schedule

Daily Checklist 4th, 7th and 8th Grade

Curriculum spreadsheet for all three boys that we use as a GUIDE to keep us on track.  

Homeschool Daily Checklists

Eat Your Way Around the World – Egypt

Gebna Makleyah, Biram Ruz, Shish Kebabs

Disclosure

This is such a fun way to study a culture … explore their traditional foods!   We are continuing with our Summer intensive studyat Your Way around the World of Paths of Exploration.  We are in the Columbus unit and just studied the various countries Columbus visited on the Mediterranean Sea and we are starting to study about his sailing experience outside the Med.  One of the required reading books that is part of the Paths of Exploration curriculum is Eat Your Way Around the World, by Jamie Aramini.  

 

 

Blake our "Precious" CookerThere are three Egyptian recipes in the cookbook.  Gebna Makleyah, Biram Ruz, and Shish Kebabs. We made all three recipes for our Egyptian Study meal.  Since Blake is the self-proclaimed, cooker, he was in the kitchen with me.  I call him my “precious cooker” (instead of pressure cooker)!  When he was little, I would ask him what he wanted to be when he grew up… he would always tell me “a cooker”!!  Needless to say, he gets as much experience in the kitchen as he wants! 

The Shish Kebabs were spicy!  We love cumin, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, onion, garlic, etc… and we eat these spices regularly!  But even for us, this was a bit of a stout flavor.  We will cook this recipe again, but we will absolutely tone it down!  It could have used more garlic and less cumin (in my opinion).  The flavor was great just too much of it.  Gage noticed how filling this meal was.  I wonder if the level of spiciness has any relationship at all to how quickly you feel full?  Something to explore!

Egyptian Shish Kebabs

We LOVED the Biram Ruz!  It is a long grain rice dish with whole milk and heavy cream… no wonder we like it, huh!?!  Seriously didn’t expect to like this one.  But we all loved it.  It was pretty bland considering the spiciness of the shish kebabs… maybe this is intentional to counter that extreme spiciness?  Either way, it was quite tasty!  

Finally, we made the Gebna Maleyah.  These surprised me.  Number one, they were surprisingly hard to make, and number two theyEgyptian Making Gebna Makleyah tasted great.  I’m not a huge Feta Cheese fan, but these may have changed my mind.  These were supposed to be cheese “balls”, as you see in the plate picture at the top of the article, they look more like pancakes.  The boys didn’t like this flavor at all (no surprise there)!  

So to wrap up our thoughts, the Egyptian meal was good, but not great.  We will try modified versions of these again… except maybe the Gebna Makleyah (the Feta Cheese dish).  They boys really did not like it, I guess that is a mature taste. Thinking about this stout flavored meal, I bet it would be FABULOUS with a nice Cabernet!  I’m pretty sure this will be a Shabbat meal soon! 

Until next time…

 

 

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